India on 16mm and 35mm with Fujifilm

INDIA: A UNIQUE PHOTOGRAPHY EXPERIENCE

“I hate you and I love you, therefore I will go back to you…. Dhanyavad India, dhanyavad”.

These were the last words that came from the deepest part of my heart. I never thought that leaving India would mean a permanent photographic melancholy and endless desire to go back to India, as well as the desire to get to rediscovered it again.

That is the way India is, is like love and hate at the same time. Contradicting feelings, so contrary and so magnetic at the same time like the ocean and the land, like a bone-chilling cold winter night and a summer’s suffocating day. India is both, at the same time, beloved and hated, until the moment when the lived experience gets assimilated; At this point, the memories wrap you, seduce you, and finally they win you over to the point where it becomes a platonic love for eternity.

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF16mm f1.4 WR R

While resting against the plane’s window with my right shoulder, I was trying to figure out whether it was hatred or love that I was feeling, while gazing over Delhi getting smaller and smaller and the memories were taken away by the clouds somewhere else. That is how my adventure met its end.

Nonetheless, and regardless my resignation to get back to my mundane live loop in Spain, there was still a burning flame with hope within me, which was able to draw in my countenance one last smile.

This flame of hope wasn’t lit by the lived experience nor the intense adventure that this journey meant. It wasn’t either thanks to all that I had learnt, nor all the magic places that I visited. The satisfaction came from all those foreign people that crossed my path from Agra to Varanasi, from Jaisalmer to Jaipur, with whom I spoke and connected, whom I immortalized in pictures, whom I materialized for eternity.

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF16mm f1.4 WR R

These unknown people that I got connected with through my photography, were a result of sporadic conversations. In each scene, in each portrait, and in each gaze that I shot, I felt how time itself was stopping right in front of my camera, in a perfect instant, as if the strangers standing in front of me wanted to share a secret message through their looks and mannerisms.

And that’s how I felt in love with the little details, with the over expressive gestures of the strangers, with their postures that didn’t welcome conversations but pure visual communication and connection.

The only way to be able to capture such magical moments is to comprehend the meaning of the unspoken visual messages and the gesture importance of the people. My photography involves learning to wait, while at the same time being ready for when the opportunity reveals itself and capture it. Mastering this involves knowing how to stop time. One accurate instant requires from a human act, an extra effort to get inside strangers.

 

PHOTOGRAPHY GEAR WITH FUJIFILM

From all the lenses that I own, the ones I used for this Project were the Fuji XF16mm f1.4 WR R and the XF35mm f1.4 R, both built on my old Fuji X-t1 (now replaced by the X-T2). While having other lenses for this project, these two were, without any doubt, the perfect choice in balance between having enough distance from the people to not bother them, while still being close enough so the communication would still flow.

This is how I manage to give those captured gazes and gestures a deeper intimacy and secrecy. The 35mm is the classic focal for the traveler. It is a small lens, discreet while nice, and with an extraordinary quality of construction and optics. The 16mm allows me to gather more information into the picture and it is the perfect choice to snap within small or packed places as a narrow street or markets. Both lenses while keep on following me throughout my adventures, searching for stranger’s daily life’s scenes and distant culture’s scents.

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

Perhaps “capturing souls” through photography may be the only way to give a meaning to our time on this earth… Freezing instants, stopping time, capturing the essence of our nature… Or maybe it is just how I feel fulfilled.

This photographic experience is part of my timeless ongoing project that I am working on called “Everyday life scenes”. It involves my photographic documentaries through Morocco, India, Nepal, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos and Thailand. On this upcoming year I will keep on enriching it with my next trips to Jordan, Iran, and maybe once more, India.

Namasté.

 

DOCUMENTARY PHOTOGRAPHY: INDIA ON 16MM AND 35MM 

All pictures below have been taking between August and September 2016 in India by Jose Carpin Copyright © All Rights Reserved

Don’t forget to visit my website here: www.josecarpin.com

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF16mm f1.4 WR R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF16mm f1.4 WR R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF16mm f1.4 WR R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

 

Fuji X-T-1 + XF35mm f1.4 R

7 Comments

  1. Beautiful captured Story and Images. Every photo speaks for itself. HOpefully you will Visit India soon again!

    • Thanks!

      Definitely I will visit India soon… I don’t have any plans ahead yet, but I would like to go back un summer 2018… India is pure magic for photography and for everything too!!!!

      Namasté 🙂 and thanks for writing!

      Regards

      Jose Carpin

  2. Geoff Smith

    Lovely work Jose.

  3. Carlos Costa

    these are my favorite focals too. To my X-Pro2 I just have 2 Fuji lenses: XF16f1.4 it’s an amusing challenge to manage so many elements within the frame and it’s great for narrow and crowded places, the XF35f2 very tiny and pocketable with great versatility and super fast af. With both lenses i feel that I don’t need anything else, although sometimes when I want to go really light or when I don’t plan anything special to shoot I alternate with the X-100F, a grab and go camera when there is no time to decide which one to take. Recently I add the mitakon 35mm f0.95 II very pleasant to portraits and interiors but it seldom leaves home.

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